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's a common occurrence. when muni says they rarely use switch back it's incredulous. they feel it's a common experience in their muni experience as it is mine. now we will switch back to me. what i want to say one of the main findings in the report is the fact that out of all the transit systems we interviewed only one used switchbacks as muni does to -- >> can i interrupt you and ask you about that? >> yes. >> perhaps i missed it, but can you talk a little bit about the other jurisdictions that you spoke with? >> you know what we're going to have in jack's report -- he's going to talk about how we chose the other jurisdictions. >> great. >> and jack and i interviewed them together and some of the other jurors joined in on the interviews but our selection was based on the controller's report that compared systems and we selected the list from the controller and contacted those systems. we were also told that all of the systems in europe use switchbacks as a tool, so we took advantage of a vacation to contact three systems in paris, and speak to representative who knew about those three sy
throughout the couple of days, indeed the u.s. military is a global force for good and we will always seek opportunities to leave every place better than when we arrived. and i appreciate your time, appreciate your attention. thank you. . (applause). >> thank you, nita, following along we're going to have colonel barry newland. >> thanks, lewis. i'd like to thank nina for doing a great job of setting the stage so i don't have to go through and do the same thing. so great job. i do not in these slides, any pictures, i will only speak briefly. lewis asked me to come and speak on this last day of the fleet week discussions because he thought that my experiences with the afghan police might shed some light on the current news, the troubling news out there of all the attacks on our uniformed personnel by uniformed afghans and it's only been pretty recent in the news that the increases happened so he thought i might be able to add some background information on that. for about 6 months i was the senior advisor to the chief of police for kabul city police department in the capitol. back at t
to be a disagreement about the use of switch backs and maybe you can talk from your point of view why you use them and let's start with that. >> okay. i think in terms of knowing -- we don't get up in the morning and say we have a goal to switchbacks. they're service management technique or tactic to make adjustment to recover from a significant delay and for us, and this is when we talked about the grand jury report when we first were briefed on it our concern was this was a lost opportunity, a lost opportunity to talk about muni service. in other words, what are the things that cause delays? what are the things we need to be doing to improve on time performance from crew reliability? what are the specific actions? what are the specific things? that's what we wanted to have. the higher the on time performance the less runs that are missed, the less vehicles break down, there is a less of a need for switchbacks. switchbacks are a symptom to us or a tactic, not part of the problem, so when do we use them? we use them when you have a significant break down, delay in service, a delay that mig
not increase driving and this park already has an area that is used for green waste. and it's nicely blocked with trees, and would not be as obtruive. the with i think the overall quality of the project management is not up to par. i'm speaking from a professional standpoint, x thank you very much. >> thank you. next speaker. >> my name is patricia lovelock and i'm here to support miss gallagher's appeal. i was one of the people at the meeting which the historian for 30-45 minutes sat in supervisor farrell's office and very calmly and very competently described what he had viewed personally as the archaeological remains at the summit. at that time, we were told, i believe it was primarily -- that they would be looking into that. we have been asking for documents. since oh, i don't know, maybe the last hearing i have been trying to get hold of the mayor's office on disability and mr. kevin jensen regard something questions with the ada. no response except for one partially responsive answer. i don't understand city people not providing questions to their constituency. i am a disabled indiv
share those with us. ray, if you'd like to start. >> sure, thank you. first off, thanks for being here, it's my first time being here and i think it's an outstanding venue to meet the cooperating agencies and talk about policies and ways we can improve our response to the public that we serve. we look at title 10, title 32 resources in all aspects, all risk venue, like i said, not only aircraft but we utilize ltax for our agreements with la county fire, to mobilize fire engines to catalina island. we look at resources for debris cleaning, i found out there's a desalization battalion for fresh water, that's an i object credible resource for an earthquake. there's a variety of dod resources that cal fire can provide in a statewide environment. i think the biggest thing for me, there's several scenarios that are challenging us, one of which and one of our fears, and it's been in the newspaper so it's not a secret, but one of the things that scares me as well is the united states is not really experienced what i would call a global disaster yet. we have had disasters, i was in katrina o
the service better than i can. so, i just want to leave you with two important things. one, i don't use services where you have to rent a smog machine and return it to the same place you started from. in san francisco we thrive on one-way, zero emission transportation options, at least i think we do. >> thank you. >>> and secondly, my last sentence, a viable one-way transportation option needs to offer reliability, accountability, and availability. and in san diego car to go does just that. thank you. >> thank you very much. keep in mind, people that in public comment you have two minutes and [speaker not understood] you have 30 seconds remaining and a louder chime when your chime is up. [speaker not understood] walter. >>> yes, thank you, supervisor cohen. if possible, can i bring [speaker not understood] now as well and we'll kind of use both of our times? >> you're not able to split your time. if you make your two minutes, i can ask you follow-up questions to allow you a few more moments to finish your thoughts. okay. how long is this going to take? >>> slightly over two. car share s
of radio frequencies, radio technology, even before the planning we didn't know what they had. it took us several planning opportunities and meetings to flush through some of that information and one of the biggest take aways for us, as a city we're required to have a tactical interoperatable communications plan. it describes how you interoperate in an emergency or an event within the city as well as regional partners. we don't have that with military and i think that's one of the biggest take aways, we need to really flesh out a document so we have captured who our contacts are, what technology they are going to bring to the table and start that initial planning from the get-go. we also had some technical challenges with land mobile radio. you know, we have the coverage issues, but we were stationed at the san francisco police department command van, i had some very sharp people there who were able to work through a lot of those interoperatability issues so a huge thank you to the police department and also the fire department and sheriff's department were also there able to provide u
was a member of the board of supervisors, all of us wondered why we hadn't done anything there and the mayor thought the same. >> if an earthquake happened, the building was uninhabitable. it sat there vacant for quite a while. the city decided to buy the building in 1999 for $2. we worked and looked at ways that we can utilize the building for an office building. to build an icon i can building that will house a lot of city departments. >> the san francisco public utilities commission has an important job. we provide clean, pristine public drinking water to 2.6 million people in the san francisco bay area from the hetch hetchy regional water system. with also generate clean renewable energy for city services like public buses, hospitals, schools, and much more. and finally, we collect and treat all the city's wastewater and stormwater making it safe enough to discharge into the san francisco bay and pacific ocean. >> in 2006 the puc was planning a record number of projects. >> the public utilities commission is a very infrastructure-rich organization. we're out there rebuilding the water sy
>> thank you for including us in "culturewire." ♪ >> the meeting will come to order. this is the monday, october 29th, 2012 meeting of the land use and economic development committee of the san francisco board of supervisors. i feel a lot of giants fever still in the air here. over here with the giants colors on. we have three items on the agenda today, but let me first say that our clerk is ms. andrea ausbery. i'm the chair of the committee, eric mar. to my right is vice-chair supervisor malia cohen. we're expecting supervisor scott wiener any moment. could you please give us our announcements? >> yes. please make sure the sounds on all cell phones, electronic devices, speaker cards and comies of documents are included as part of the file to submit to the clerk. items on the november 6 board agenda unless otherwise stated. >> thank you. i'd like to also thank sfgtv for televising us today, especially our staff greg burk and john ross. we have three items on the agenda today. ms. ausbery please call item number 1. >> item number 1, administrative code - port prepayme
. it was a display of competence. and it gives us confidence that not only is the military going to help us if we have a problem here, but the military is able to do its job of protecting our national security with confidence. it's wonderful to see confidence on display. i was asking myself as i listened to the panel today and i'm working with mike and leslie on the program, what kind of words would describe what we're doing? well, certainly impressive is one. reassuring is one, that we see what's going on, the planning, the capabilities. i think another is to underline the importance and then this panel in particular they underline t the importance of looking on this as a building operation. each year has been a little better than the year before or different. if that's been iterative or a plus [speaker not understood]. somebody asked if we could keep this going. may i remind you it's been going for 31 years. we've had this last two years that have been the most impressive iteration, but it's been going for a long while. let me try to sort of summarize it by using an image. how many of you have
because it's an incredibly labor inextensive process. and we used students, volunteers, interns literally to do that, but we spent incredible amount of time on the ground. part of that was to get good data, but also again, back to my point about understanding the existing community, we wanted to make sure the technical team got to really know the landscape that they were planning. and not just approach it at a theoretical level. one of the things that came out of this was to figure out what will be a suitable sites for new development, of course. there is typical soft site analysis we do with planning, get data sets and come up with places that are under utilized, whatever reasons they could be developed [speaker not understood]. it's typically done remotely. we wanted to have a little bit more of a robust analysis and methodology. so, we developed this housing suitability criteria approach. this is just a couple of slides out of it, with a scoring system that, you know, calculation of the number of units that could be produced, what is the existing type of use of a site. is there histori
to help us, that are here to practice what we preach and again also to all the different agencies that are working together with us. thank you very much for being here, happy fleet week. . >> when people ask me about our mayor, i tell them, he gets it. you can see that from his remarks just now. he knows what this is about. and a lot of other people get it, too, and i want to tell you after fleet week the senior leaders seminar last year, the word got around. and in november there was a massive earthquake in have an, turkey, and the city of san francisco and the san francisco fleet week association were asked to send a team to do an assessment of their earthquake and their preparations or lack of preparation. so the word is getting out. seattle invited us to come up and talk to them about incorporating that, this program, into their fleet week. so the word is getting out. i'd like to tell you just a story that i've told before to some of you but it relates very much to the next panel that we have here. back in april of 1992, i was commanding the first marine division and we
also have the director of hud here and he is going to lead us and then we will have mayor lee up in a moment. >> thank you very much and it really is a privilege to be here with you today and to build on henry's comments and it's extraordinary that the grants across the country that were awarded to hud two of them are in the same state and it's more extraordinary that both of them are in the same city, san francisco so congratulations. [cheers and applause] so for context i just want to mention a few things and this is no news to all of you here in the room and the people standing up with me today, but today in america more than 10 million people are living in neighborhoods of concentrated poverty and limited investment and opportunities for themselves and their children, and we know that one of the most important factors in determining the economic and financial success of peoples whether or not a child grows up in those high poverty neighborhoods? a. the fact that we can predict health, education outcomes of children based on the zip code, where they live is really a tragedy an
by supervisor sean elsbernd. the clerk of the committee is mr. victor young and mr. clerk, can you share with us your announcements? >> please turn off all cell phones and electronic devices. items acted upon today will be forwarded to the full board of supervisors meeting of november 20th, unless otherwise stated. thank you. >> i wanted to acknowledge our sfgovtv staff who are work on this hearing. that is nona and jesse larson. could you call our first item. >> item no. 1, resource approving and authorizing an agreement for the purchase of parcel of real estate located at 1550 evans avenue and 330 newhall street consisting of approximately 4.6 acres improved with 50,593 square feet of office and industrial buildings for the san francisco public utilities commission for a purchase price of $15 million, adopting findings under ceqa, adopting findings that the conveyance is consistent with the city's general plan and eight priority polices of city planning code section 101.1 and authorizing the director of property to executive documents make certain modifications and take certain actions in f
, the streets, cars, we have this oasis of a natural environment. it reminds us of what san francisco initially was. >> this is a section for dogs and plenty of parking. transit is available to get you there easily. and the part is ada -- park is ada accessible. there is also a natural lake. this is your chance to stroll and let the kids run free. it also has many birds to watch. it is the place to find some solitude from the city and appreciate what you share with a wonderful breath of fresh air. , an experienced this park and enjoy the peoples, picnics, and sunshine. this is a lovely place to take a stroll with your loved one hand in hand. located in the middle of pacific heights on top of a hill, lafayette park offers a great square a of a peaceful beauty. large trees border greenery. it features tables and benches, a playground, restaurants, and tennis courts. there are plenty of areas for football, frisbee, and picnics. it is very much a couple's part and there are a multitude of experiences you can have together. bring your dog and watch the mean go with the community or just picnic at o
a tour of balboa park station which i use very frequently. balboa park station is a station that 10,000 people a day plus use to go to city college or get to downtown. it's our biggest transit hub outside of the downtown area of san francisco, in the whole bay area region. and it is completely inadequate. it looks like a hub that you would expect to find behind the eastern block -- an eastern block country back in the 1980s. it has not had any real substantial investment in years. i pushed a little bit to get some curb ramps which is the tip of the iceberg of what is actually needed. this is a video i'd like to show of what the conditions are and i hope, colleagues, you can actually take about 15 seconds to look at this. this is what people face every day and it's a very dangerous situation that we have. john, if you could. [video presentation] >> this is the boarding area of the j church and the [speaker not understood]. little pinpoint right here, a child is actually approaching a vehicle almost getting hit by the actual car. you see these poles on the left that stand up? there's
have a number of poets that are with us today in the chambers. before i get to the two richmond district poets, david [speaker not understood] and poetry teacher and poet susan [speaker not understood], i wanted to first introduce our first honored guest, alejandro [speaker not understood], he's the sixth poet laureate for the city and county of san francisco. and can alejandro come forward? there he is. (applause) >> i wanted to first say he's a unique artist and community person. he follows in the footsteps of our first poet laureate, learn serangeti in '98, [speaker not understood] in 2000, deborah major in 2002, jack cushman in 2006, and dianne de prima in 2009. and he moved to san francisco in the early '70s from los angeles, but really has become embedded in the mission district. and i know that supervisor campos is going to make a couple of remarks in a moment. alejandro, i know, is a great teacher at san francisco state where i taught many years. his students see him as a mission visionary. he's also someone that works collectively with other poets. i pulled this off my
. this item we can open up for public comment. and seeing no one here, but us chickens we'll close public comment. just some words on this. i actually did not support this ordinance as a stand-alone ordinance, looking at the exemption first of all for small businesses earlier this year. i know that that actual ordinance was anticipating a gross receipts tax that could go to the ballot. we hospital yet drafted that gross receipts tax. i did not approve -- i did not vote in favor of. it i think i was the one person for voting against it. my reasoning for doing that i didn't want to do one exception to our current business tax. i didn't want to do that, but i'm actually going to be supporting this measure today, because i see in context of an actual gross receipts tax measure that is going to the ballot. that will be overall changes to the gross receipts tax if this measure actually now relates to that directly. and i can anticipate what the actual structure of the gross receipts tax is going to be in relation to this measure. so i will be supportive of this going forward. knowing that i
to establish 108,399 gross square feet of legal office use in a pdr-1-g zoning district and 68-x height and bulk district. i have no speaker cards. >> is there any public comment on the items proposed on the consent calendar? seeing none, commissioner antonini? >> move to approve. >> second. >> on that motion to approve, commissioner antonini? >> aye. >> commissioner moore? >> aye. >> commissioner sugaya? >> aye. commissioner wu? >> aye. >> and commissionedthv fong? >> aye. >> so moved, commissioners, that motion passes unanimously. which places you under your commissioners questions and matters. item 3, consideration of adoption, draft minutes of special meeting of october 11, 2012 and draft minutes of regular meeting of october 18, 2012. >> any public comment on the draft minutes? seeing none, commissioner sugaya? >> yes, on thursday, october 11 under item 1, which is on page 2 under speakers, i believe didn't sue hester testify on this item? 295 as related to the transit center district plans. anyway, her name is not listed. maybe the secretary can check. -- check on that. >> i can c
and [speaker not understood] the mayor's office of housing has used and intends to use the affordable housing parcels. clearly one of the goals of the early involvement of the redevelopment agency was to front money towards the completion of the boulevard and facilitate that at a time when there were not entitlements for the remaining parcels. and, so, we were able to enter into agreements with the city early on, provide funds, funds that were from our low mod housing funds to the city so that the city could begin working on the octavia boulevard. and we were very, very glad to do that, in part, because one of the goals of the -- both the neighbors as well as the city was to restitch the neighborhood. not only were we talking about transportation improvements. we're talking about how we're going to rebuild upon those vacant parcels and how those vacant parcels add to a reinvigorated neighborhood. and i'm very, very pleased that work with the neighbors in creating half of those units that were -- are being projected as affordable housing units and doing that in a way that has been very, very s
of all of us. i'm the principal investigator on this project and that means that i'm supposed to be in charge of making sure it happens. so, we're 70% done and you're seeing one of the major parts of it today. and i want to introduce susan so we can get the show on the road. so, thank you so much. (applause) >> well, i want to welcome you all here today for the launch of our state offices aids renovation project otherwise known as soar. and i'm susan buck binder. i'm speaking on behalf of the entire aids office. we are fortunate to be a world class research organization housed within the health department which is pretty much unique globally. we have three amazing sections that we work with. the first is the surveillance epidemiology section. they really started at the very beginning of the hiv epidemic in tracking what was then known as grid and other term and became aids and then also tracking new cases of hiv infection. and, so, there's really been leaders around the world in how to track trends in new infections and that is what helps us drive both our prevention and our t
to us actually being in the time of the end is correct. now, there's two ways to do this. it's doubled. the first way to do this, to determine that we're in the last days is to take the 560 years from the destruction of the temple to jesus christ, multiplying it by 3-1/2, the figure given in the book of revelation to the second coming and add the first 560. that would give us 2,5 20 years. the second way that we can verify our math is found in the mysterious [bell]. >> thank you very much. next speaker. >>> [speaker not understood] seventh century china. then introduced into europe in 13th century by trade with china. so, where is san francisco public library? capital currency is means of labor exchange for production of basic needs. strict relation to right to life, control ranks of class, give financial cost its prime. this dictated exchange knows antagonism and revolutions, but not its end. education, schooltion, work ethic for basic needs, childbirth humanity to death. a financial cost that as of 2012 international world order is based upon financial cost. capital currency financia
you. [cheers and applause] >> great job bochy. for somebody uses vice for a living it's never good to follow him. he's got the pipes. well, john, dwayne and mike are and are privileged to be part of this giants organization, to be the giants broadcasters but we're not the only four. there are two other members of the giants broadcast team who are critical to what we do and i think the best spanish language speaking broadcast in baseball and we want to become them to the podium now and been the voice for the giants for spanish for 15 years and his partner and please welcome tito friend. [cheers and applause] >> wow, is this amazing or what? two times in three years. we can get used to this. right, tito? yep. anyway the only thing i can say is thank you to these 25 guys right here. for years i took math and they told me that five time five is 25 but i think five times five is one because they showed they can play 25 as one individual and that's how they got it done. [cheers and applause] now, i'm going to talk to my family -- [speaking spanish] >> thank you. i just want to sa
. he told us supporters, voting for revenge, vote for revenge? let me tell what you i'd like to tell you. vote for love of country. >> voting is the best revenge. >> other republican campaign is making a last minute play for pennsylvania. this weekend both mitt romney and paul ryan are campaigning in that state. ryan is in harrisburg, pennsylvania, today and tomorrow. romney heading to bucks county. and cnn political editor paul stein houser is live from harrisburg right now. the polls show that romney is narrowing the gap with obama in that state. can he realistically hope to take the state this late in the game? >> reporter: no doubt about it. 90 minutes from me at the airport you'll have paul ryan, the republican running mate holding a rally. yeah, tomorrow mitt romney is going to be in suburban philadelphia. that's the swing part of the state, the part of the state that really determines who wins pennsylvania's 20 electoral votes. the obama campaign is not taking this sitting down. jill biden is coming to pennsylvania to campaign today. and one of the big guns on the obama side,
fair buildings. or for any athletic field, call 831-5510. you can write us at -- or walk in and say hello. and of course you can find more information moresfrecpark.org. -- >>> super bowl bid committee, which i'm excited and thrilled to say. [ applause ] >> we were waiting for the nfl's announcement. we got that tuesday. now we can talk more. i want to acknowledge chris kelly, pat gallager, jim wonderman, we are expecting ron conway and mary murphy to join us. i also wanted to turn the microphone over to mayor lee to talk about why we are here. that is to unveil our logo, social media campaign. we will have rich silverstein, the head of this amazing ad agency working the past month to come to this point. we are going to hear from the ceo of the 49ers, jet york as well. supervisor mark ferrell, who will be our key liaison to the board of supervisors here in san francisco i want to acknowledge mayor reeve and williams weren't able to make it. we are committed to the effort and our theme of bringing the bowl to the bay. that will be important because we can't do this alone. we are exci
walking, biking and transit use because people -- and i may be a poster child for this. i am able to live -- my family and i are able to live in san francisco without owning a car because of the existence of car sharing. and, so, because we don't need a car, because of the existence of car sharing, we generally rely on transit. for me, i ride my bike a lot. sometimes we take taxis. we often walk to where we're going. but the fact we don't own a vehicle means we're less inclined to just jump in our vehicles for times when we might not otherwise need it. when we do need to drive our own car, we get a car-share vehicle. so, i think if i may be so bold as to say that kind of use epitomizes ways in which car sharing, the existence of car sharing really has very tangible benefits to the transportation system and to the natural environment. so, supervisor wiener made some reference to the fact there are different types of car sharing. this is a spectrum that has the traditional model such as we have here in the city on one end of the spectrum. there are peer-to-peer models that have developed ov
this kind of little dream we had that you became the perfect leader for us. it has come out clearly that was not only the correct decision but really enthusiastic, so thank you for stepping up. let me begin by saying there was some vibration this morning. yes, part of it, we were doing the california shake-up drill with 9.3 million in the state of california, but i think there was vibrations. mayor mathews and mayor reed were jumping up and down because i told them we were putting together something that would not only be a great way to work together but something they have also been personally wishing could happen and be led by the city. so today we are of course unveiling our promotional launch but getting here has been something on my mind. it's been one of those very solid topic that jen and i spent good time together. my office, where i call it inappropriately the man cave, but it is a place where i think we have had a chance to talk about the honest going relationship that the niners, the oldest professional sports franchise in the state of california, that's still here in the
with the central corridor plan which will be come tog us in two years. at this point right now i would prefer to move forward with the west soma plan as is, but to acknowledge when we pass the plan that we have already initiated the central corridor planning process and that we will be rezoning portions of west soma to fit in with the studies that we are currently undertaking with central corridor. not only do we need to grow in residential and the mixed use that is incorporated in western soma, but we also acknowledge there is a need for growth of other types of commercial space like office. particularly along areas that will have access to more public transit and that would be the central subway that is developed. so, a preference at this point would be to move forward with the plan as is, but to acknowledge that there will be some rezoning that may take place over the next two years. so, i want to thank you commissioners for your engagement and guidance throughout this process. i also want to recognize [speaker not understood] who has been wonderful since taking over this plan since paul l
of the dead and honors those no longer with us including loved ones and ancestors. amber lee is with us to show us the roots of this tradition. >> reporter: we're live where people have set up altars like this one. but the main attraction is the annual procession through the streets of the mission. all eyes were drawn to the aztec dancers and their colorful head gear witnessed by hundreds in the procession many with candles. the spirit of ancestors come to visit once a year on this day. >> i'm teeling -- feeling very happy and feel great to showcase our culture. >> they have the food and drink that they love and things like that to honor the dead. >> reporter: this woman told us the tradition of face paint appealed to her as she honored her friend robert yagey killed in a bicycling accident years ago. >> i love that people come together to make art in the name of someone they love to create something beautiful, you know when things are seemingly falling apart. >> reporter: this woman built an altar if her late son-in-law and deceased family members. >> this is like bringing them back
panelists who will give us their perspective. >> so we're going to do a little bit of a hot swap here to keep the show rolling. while we seat the panel i'm going to introduce them but focus on medical. this just started up last year formally, but i have to say it really started in 2010, the idea of how do we highlight the medical because for those who don't know my history, i'm an old paramedic so this kind of comes naturally to me. in 2010 we were aboard the macon island, one of the things i was fascinated with as were the attendees was the hospital space. there were a bunch of tours that took place there. last year the idea, it wasn't my idea and i wish i could claim it but i can't, the idea to do a medical peer to peer exchange between the military and the hospital providers here in town. so it was arranged where practitioners and executives, so practitioners and their bosses, to could come out and see the shock trauma platoon and see the capabilities of the shark and see what the military brings to the table in terms of medical. it was a huge hit, to be perfectly honest. it w
it is limited and so that would be important for us to understand what the resupply process would be as we move forward on that. so we can certainly hit the ground running, but then we would need some sort shortly thereafter. >> mine is a two-part question. we've seen in ismat turkey in 1999 a number of walking wounded that will immediately overwhelm the medical response community and then how do you disallow them immediate health care and the specter of reality tv, so that would be the first part, managing expectation in our gold standard health care system. the other part of that response, to maximize the saving of lives, they actually severed limbs in the response process to maximize the safing lives. have we talked about indemnify case of our medical response teams post response? ?oo ?a we did not actually discuss indemnify case or any other legal or even ethical issues on a broader kail. all the hospitals do have plans to handle a surge of patients including a very large number of walking wounded. we assume they will arrive at the hospital starting immediately, even sometimes before t
that we do day-to-day to make sure our network is available and ready to use for the public. no. 1 is back-up systems. so just to give you a brief idea of how our network works, we have two major components of our network, we have our cet sites and our switches. in our cet sites, in all of our cell sites, we actually have batteries to account for power out ages. that's 8 hour back-up time for our batteries and in addition, most of our cell sites actually have back-up generators as well. we have about 4 days of stand by time to about maybe 10 days and then on top of that we have vendors that we work with that are on stand by to make sure that we can refuel our cell sites and also maintain them if our generators do go out of service. and then as far as our switches, so the switches are control centers that manage all our cell sites. we have about 300 cell sites per switch and in the bay area we have about 4 switches. what we have there is also back-up power so we have batteries, we have generators, not only one generator, sometimes we have 3 generators to account for failure for one of
. and a lot of this is through the work of staff and the superintendent and for us to be focused on what we're doing we need to improve student achievement. now, why am i talking about education that much? mainly because i have a public record of eight years, a proven track record where i've worked with people and gotten results. so, this is the type of independent voice that i'm going to bring into district 7 as a supervisor. i will bring not only my leadership, my ability to build bristol-myers squibbvxes and build consensus, but i'm going to find -- you're going to find that i'm very solution oriented. and that i'm not wedded to any particular ideology about where the solutions come from. whether solutions come from the right or the left or the middle, it doesn't matter to me. solutions we find is solution. so, here i am. why am i running for leadership? i want to focus on our economy. i want to grow job opportunities for the students that are graduating our high schools. they are now graduating, beginning to graduate with requirements. they are totally prepared to take on this high wage
, and $500 haircuts. so they have money. they are trying to tell us they don't. snee in ? response, they say they are $1.3 billion in debt. spokesperson sent you the a statement, saying the employees union workers are the best compensated for their classification in the region. our young -- our union employees make 20% more. 0 the spokesperson said we are acting as thoroughly at possible to address allegations of improper port expenditures. coming up at 6:00 we will have more on what port workers said about the possibility of a strike at the maritime pork and oakland -- port and the oakland airport if the issues do not get resolved in time for the holiday season. >>> more details on the investigation on possible inappropriate behavior by port officials. as ally mentioned, our investigation found that two port executives had spent $4500 in public money at a strip club in houston. those two executives are now owner administrative leave. and we recently showed you video of two oakland police officer making late night visits to a karaoke club that neighbors think might be a front for prostitutio
then became our secretary of defense. and many of us that have served thought that he was one of the best secretary of defenses we've ever had. he's currently a senior fellow at the hoover institute and a freeman foley institute of international studies. he is the michael and barbara bavarian professor at stanford university and serves as co-director of the nuclear risk reduction initiative and preventive defense project. please help me welcome our speaker this morning, former secretary of defense william perry. (applause) >> what a pleasure it is to be aboard this symbol of america's millery power, the uss macon island. what a pleasure it is to be among the men and women of our armed forces and the men and women of the first responders of the san francisco bay area. fleet week for many years in san francisco was a somewhat [inaudible] affair and it has been transformed into this great coming together by the military and the first responders, the great coming together of our uniformed personnel and a great [speaker not understood] of san francisco. this amazing transformation in the last
c3-699-13, appears to use the term to the extent permitted by state law. >> i draw your attention, commissioner hur to section 1040 b. i'm assuming that state law takes precedence over 699-13. i would assume, sir, that you would know that 1040 should take precedence over the city charters or this particular government conduct code which is not even at the city charter level, if i am right. >> 1040 b, clearly states, a public entity is a privilege to refuse to disclose official information... unless disclosure is forbidden. there is nothing >> in the act of the u.s. congress or any other statue that forbids the disclosure of the information that i am seeking. >> except that there is another paragraph, mr. shaw. i mean the basis for miss herrick's analysis is 1040 b2. she is not claiming that there is an act of congress that forbids this. she is claiming that the necessity for perceiving confidentiality out weighs disclosure. >> commissioner hur, let me respond to that question and that is, sunshine ordinance, if you have ever read it specifically bars every agency in san francisco
to be better than us after a bunch of trades. the los angeles dodgers are -- all right. the giants. they're down to two games of cincinnati. they win three straight. the reds are? >> audience: out of here! >> it has to be louder for the next two. are you ready? the giants go to st. louis and need to win there and back home. the st. louis cardinals are? >> audience: out of here! >> now for the big one. the mighty american league detroit tigers. you ready? the detroit tigers -- they are? audience: out of here! >> you never disappoint. here is my partner mike. >> well, we have become an organization of expertation. there's expectation when you win a championship in 2010 and there is expectation when you get in that ballpark everyday and it's over flowing with your love and affection and there is purity in the formula that this organization goes about trying to meet those standards of excellence. it starts with the fans of historians that we call investors that kept us here in san francisco and goes to the front office comprised of men and women dedicating their lives to this team
with us. welcome back to the continuation of our debate. with us today, congressman allen west and patrick murphy. we will continue our discussion with george bennett. >> we left hanging on the deficit. you are opposed to raising taxes. the deficit this past year was $1.1 trillion. if you are not going to raise taxes, what are the things you can cut to get close to erasing a $1.1 trillion deficit? >> we should be about $230 billion, but we have to look at agencies that were created that are not meeting up to their mission. you look at the department at energy that was created when i was a teenager. it was to make the united states energy independent. what has happened with that department over the last 40 years? we look at the expansion of the government and education. when we separated education out of health, education, and welfare. we have spent more money at education at the federal government level, money that could have been used better at the local levels. we have to look at these duplicative programs. we have got to move away from baseline budget to zero-based budget. >> the gao ha
something 70% full timers 20 years ago to now 70% part-timers. they are also using new technology that sets employee hours by tracking the ebb and flow of customer traffic. >> technology destroys jobs. >> reporter: for people like karen, part time is enough time for now. >> hoping this will be the start of the next big thing for me. >> reporter: so the jobs market is gaining momentum but many of those out there are paying less and less. meanwhile, the paragon outlet mall in livermore is in the process of hiring more than 2,000 part time and full-time workers. in livermore, elissa harrington, cbs 5. >> a new poll shows a dramatic shift in the way californians think about the death penalty. cbs 5 political reporter grace lee on how they may be ready to end capital punishment here. grace. >> reporter: records the field poll has been asking this questions for six decades typically they would vote no supporting the death penalty. right now at this time in fact cycle most people vote no if they're undecided. that's not what we're seeing in this poll. it surprised a lot of people including the fie
and 1 dollar from all of us. that can really help and donate at red cross .org and we thank you for your generosity. it was just two years ago that we captured the championship since moving to san francisco and i think we're happy we didn't have to wait until 52 years. [cheers and applause] we've got another trophy in this great city by the bay. [cheers and applause] so today giants fans once again you are all world champions and together we are giants, so we have a wonderful program planned for you today and i know you're anxious to get this started started and bring the guys out and celebrate your 2012 san francisco giants so let's get started. first of all we are joined by a number of special dignitaries who have helped to make san francisco one of the best baseball towns -- no, the best baseball town in america. [cheers and applause] let us now welcome and please show your love and enthusiasm the mayor of city and county of san francisco the honorable edwin lee. former mayor and current lieutenant governor the honorable gavin newsom. the city chief of protocol charlotte schultz,
three-car stacked elevator garage behind the property. while some tenants use public transit, some have cars. i believe that most of the delays for the garage application have first been due to delays from neighbor appeals. and then second to a lesser degree from city delays. i do not believe that the delays by the city have been caused by maliciousness. third, i have also been responsible for short delays, most of those due to my coping with hiv side effects, which often slow me down, but i have still tried to keep up. and be as responsible as possible to keep up with the schedule. scott sanchez' august 28th letter of determination, which is being appealed now, he detailed the other two extensions that had been granted for this variance. he outlined that the first extension was due to time elapsed as the result of neighbors' appeals of the original garage permit. and he also oust outlined that the second extension was as a result of the delays of discretionary review hearing that was requested by neighbors for group housing performance. now we're delayed by another neighbor appea
and i nose it's not a cost-savings to the puc because they weren't paying to use it. are there ways fort departments to generate revenue from the sighs now that the puc will no longer be occupying it? >> supervisor kim with respect to the property particularly that is associated with fire, i believe that [shr-r/] in discussion amongst dpw, my staff and capital planning. so i think we're looking at reuse, where possibility, where we're vacating or pulling certain uses off city-owned property s. >> so i'm sorry for 2245 gerald? >> that would be gerald. >> so the fire department may reuse that site now? >> yes. >> it would be great to learn how we reutilize sites or see if there are ways of generating -- i don't know if they are releasable. >> we're looking at a broader picture of all the industry yard needs that the city has. they are quite numerous. this board deliberated over an issue recently with the mta, that i think brought to light some of the challenges that we have to find industrial uses. there is only so much within the city footprint and we're looking can we con
that from public scrutiny. the whistle blower laws are not be used to protect the whistle blower but to protect the target. they are being used to hide the true facts of the investigation and to allow the city agency and employees to evade their actions. they hide the extent and the validity of the investigative process used by the ethics staff and the public records law are always intended to disclose rather than conceal public matters. instead these laws are purposefully misinterpreted to protect the agencies in question but also the ethics staff. as far as you not having a conflict of interest, let's look at the arts commission when they got the report from the civil grand jury that listed what they had done, including spending $300,000 on things that they had no legal authority to do so. charging fees, that they had no legal authority and fire the cultural director and replace the head of the commission. the bottom line is if you were a commission and you were in charge of a staff and a staff screws up it reflects on you. you can't sit there and say, oh, if we find our execut
tomorrow to the republican party across the political spectrum opposes us wasting this money, particularly because it is a plan that has been conducted at least 7 times over the last many decades and each time we've been told it is a colossal failure and not one we should pursue. >> mike, this gives you an opportunity to tell us why this time would be different. >> what sean is describing is not what's in the initiative. it's just a planning process. yes, our goal is to bring the hetch hetchy valley and yosemite back to life. san francisco is the only city allowed to park its water in a national park. a hundred years we made that decision and bee think every hundred years san francisco should revisit that decision. there's no down side to that. but you can't do that without also reforming our 19th century water system. it was designed in the 19th century and as a result it's very damaging to the environment. what we do is look at how do we consolidate from 9 reservoirs into 8 and begin to build our local water resources to offset a small percentage of water loss that might happen. le
and build affordable housing and build the schools and keep us safe. i am running for supervisor to keep san francisco real. our city is a social, economic and political cross roads. in so many ways, the every-day people that keep this city special, the artists, the students, the young families, the seniors on fixed income, working people and every day people of all strides are having a harder and harder time surviving much less thriving in our city. one of the reasons is that our economic development policies are currently much too focused on the big business interest. we need to reorient our city's development policies to focus on the 80 percent of the economy which is our small businesses or mom and pop shops. san francisco needs to develop more affordable housing. the association of bay government says that they need 18,000 new units of housing and we are nowhere close to that. prop c, something that i encourage you to vote for, but let's go back to the ballot in the years to come and pass an affordable housing bond something that san francisco has not done in close to two decades. we ne
with the maritime services and the coast guard and our reserve forces, i like to think of us as america's or the world's 911 when something bad, either man-made or natural happens, some catastrophe happens in the world, often times the ambassador will pick up the phone and dial 911 and the navy marine corps team answers the phone. it is our those, it is our dna it is our ability to be there. if you look at the communicate dapbt's 3 central tenets of what he believes it importance, readiness is in there. the ability to move and go now. where do you want us, when do you want us, like fedex, we are absolutely guaranteed to be there overnight. it's what we do. it's what we are trained for. and the more we understand and can operate with civic forces, the more we understand what already exists in our life line, the more we can break down political barriers and culture barriers that exist within our own country, the more we can partner and stabilize and support civic operations, because as someone said earlier in the panel, if we need to come in, things are pretty bad. but here's the go
. >> donald cutler also made the trip. he spoke to us by skype. >> i was extremely conflicted about running this race. but as long as it was on, i thought it was safe. >> mayor bloomberg said the race was still on but criticism continued to mount, especially over all the resources it was pulling, including food and generators, that could have been used in other parts of the city. the mayor relented and suddenly cancelled the race. >> i'm a lot upset with the leadership of the city, with the mayor, with mary wittenberg, the ceo of road runners. i think it was a gigantic mistake to keep it going as long as they did. >> with much of new york still in at that timers, all the runners i talked to agree that canling the race was the right decision and while in town they hope to volunteer their time. >> i'm hoping by sunday to be able to pitch in on staten island because that's where the worst damage is and where they can use a pair of hands and a shovel. >> most san francisco runners i talked to who are in new york said there are a number of websites and facebook posts listing volunteer opportunit
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